BINGE EATING DISORDER

Binge Eating Disorder is characterised by frequent eating of excessive amounts of food,
often when not hungry. A person with BED will not use compensatory behaviours.

Signs of Binge Eating Disorder

Physical:

  • Feeling tired and not sleeping well
  • Feeling bloated
  • Feeling constipated
  • Developing intolerances to food
  • At risk of developing medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, gallbladder disease, heart disease and certain types of cancers

Psychological:

  • Preoccupation with eating, food, body shape and weight
  • Extreme body dissatisfaction and shame about their appearance
  • Feelings of extreme distress, sadness, anxiety and guilt during and after a binge episode
  • Low self esteem
  • Increased sensitivity to comments relating to food, weight, body shape, exercise
  • Depression, anxiety or irritability

Behavioural:

  • Evidence of binge eating (e.g. disappearance or hoarding of food)
  • Secretive behaviour relating to food (e.g. hiding food and food wrappers around the house)
  • Evading questions about eating and weight
  • Increased isolation and withdrawal from activities previously enjoyed
  • Erratic behaviour (e.g. shoplifting food or spending large amounts of money on food)
  • Self harm, substance abuse or suicide attempts

IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW IS SHOWING THESE SIGNS,
PLEASE SEEK HELP & SUPPORT USING THE RESOURCES AVAILABLE ON THIS SITE

Binge Eating Disorder Statistics

0 %
OF ALL FEMALES EXPERIENCE BED

The National Eating Disorders Collaboration (2010). Eating Disorders Prevention, Treatment & Management: An Evidence Review. Retrieved from http://www.nedc.com.au/nedc-publications.)

0 %
OF ALL MALES EXPERIENCE BED

The National Eating Disorders Collaboration (2010). Eating Disorders Prevention, Treatment & Management: An Evidence Review. Retrieved from http://www.nedc.com.au/nedc-publications.

0 %
OF THOSE IN WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAMS MEET B.E.D CRITERIA

Lindberg, L .& Hjern, A. (2003). Risk factors for anorexia nervosa: a national cohort study. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 34 (4), 397-408.

0
MEDIAN AGE OF ONSET

Understanding Eating Disorders. (1997). The Eating Disorders Association Resource Centre.

TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR BINGE EATING DISORDER

  • Psychological Treatments
  • Evidence-based self-help programs
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy for Binge Eating Disorder
  • Interpersonal psychotherapy
  • Dialectical behaviour therapy
  • Antidepressants (SSRIs) can also be used in treating those with Binge Eating Disorder.
  • If the person with the eating disorder also presents with symptoms of obesity, this will need to be managed simultaneously using the appropriate treatment.
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