OSFED

Formally known as Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS),
Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder, causes significant distress or impairment,
but does not meet the criteria for another ED.

Signs of OSFED

Physical:

  • Weight loss, gain or weight fluctuations
  • Loss of or disturbance of menstrual periods in girls and women and decreased libido in men
  • Fainting & dizziness as a result of dehydration
  • Compromised immune system, getting sick more often
  • Signs of damage due to vomiting including swelling around the cheeks or jaw, calluses on knuckles, damage to teeth and bad breath

Psychological:

  • Preoccupation with food & eating
  • Preoccupation with body shape and weight (in men this can be a preoccupation with increasing muscle bulk)
  • Extreme body dissatisfaction
  • Having a distorted body image
  • Sensitivity to comments relating to food, weight, body shape or exercise
  • Heightened anxiety and/or irritability around meal times
  • Depression, anxiety or irritability
  • Low self esteem and feelings of shame, self loathing or guilt
  • ‘Black and white’ thinking such as thoughts about food being ‘good’ or ‘bad’

Behavioural:

  • Dieting behaviour such as fasting, counting calories, avoiding food groups
  • Evidence of binge eating
  • Frequent trips to the bathroom during or shortly after meals
  • Compulsive or excessive exercising
  • Eating at unusual times and/or after going to sleep at night
  • Changes in food preferences
  • Obsessive rituals around food preparation and eating
  • Anti-social behaviour, particularly around meal times, and withdrawal from social situations involving food
  • Secretive behaviour around food
  • Increased interest and focus on body shape and weight
  • Repetitive or obsessive behaviours relating to body shape and weight
  • Increased isolation and avoiding previously enjoyed activities

IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW IS SHOWING THESE SIGNS,
PLEASE SEEK HELP & SUPPORT USING THE RESOURCES AVAILABLE ON THIS SITE

OSFED Statistics

0 %
OF THOSE SEEKING ED TREATMENT HAVE OSFED

www.nedc.com.au/osfed

0
SUB-TYPES OF OSFED

www.anad.org/get-information/about-eating-disorders/eatingdisorders-not-otherwise-specified/

0 %
OF MALES AGED 11-24 ARE DISSATISFIED WITH THEIR APPEARANCE

The National Eating Disorders Collaboration (2010). Eating Disorders Prevention, Treatment & Management: An Evidence Review. Retrieved from http://www.nedc.com.au/nedc-publications.

0 %
OF FEMALES AGED 11-24 ARE DISSATISFIED WITH THEIR APPEARANCE

The National Eating Disorders Collaboration (2010). Eating Disorders Prevention, Treatment & Management: An Evidence Review. Retrieved from http://www.nedc.com.au/nedc-publications.

TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR OSFED

As a result of the atypical nature of OSFED, it is most effective to follow the treatments recommended for the eating disorder that most closely resembles the individual person’s eating problem. For example, if a person presents with many but not all of the symptoms of Bulimia Nervosa, it is recommended for that person to seek the same treatment approaches recommended for people with Bulimia Nervosa.

To get an idea of which OSFED category you or someone you know may fit into, here’s some information about the 5 sub types:

1. Atypical Anorexia Nervosa: Restrictive behaviors and features without meting the low weight criteria.
2. Bulimia Nervosa: Meets the criteria for Bulimia Nervosa but at a lower frequency and/or limited duration. Episodes of eating, in a discrete period of time an amount of food that is larger than what most individuals would eat with a feeling of lack of control. This followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting; misuse of laxatives, diuretics, excessive exercising, fasting.
3. Binge Eating Disorder: Meets the criteria for Binge Eating Disorder but at a lower frequency and/or limited duration. Episodes of eating, in a discrete period of time an amount of food that is larger than what most individuals would eat with a feeling of lack of control.

4. Purging Disorder: Recurrent purging of calories by self induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives and diuretics, excessive exercising. This subtype does not include binge eating.
5. Night Eating Syndrome: Recurrent episodes of night eating, as manifested by eating after awakening from sleep or by excessive food consumption after the evening meal. There is awareness and recall of the eating.
The risks associated with OSFED are just as severe as any other eating disorder. Individuals with OSFED will experience risks similar to  other eating disorders. Some previous studies show the mortality rate of OSFED to be as high as individuals who meet the thresholds for Anorexia Nervosa.

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